When is Dental Cement Used?

Are you looking for a little more information on dental cement?

Dental cements are made using a special group of materials and allow dentists to provide their patients with the restorative dental services they need for good oral health.

Because dental cement will be placed into a patient’s mouth, there are specific properties these adhesives must contain for them not to cause any problems. When a dentist chooses a dental cement to use on their patients, they often look for a cement that is non-irritating, resistant to saliva, has an acceptable setting time, offers great aesthetics and provides excellent retention.

When does a dentist use dental cement?

There are many ways a dentist can use dental cement when treating their patients, with three of the more common reasons listed below. Each type of cement comes with its own advantages and disadvantages. A dentist will make the decision on which type of adhesive to use after reviewing the patient’s oral and general health.

Temporary tooth restorations

When a patient needs a temporary crown or a temporary bridge, a dentist will use cement to temporarily hold these dental treatments in their place. It stays there until the permanent crown or bridge can be placed into the patient's mouth.

Bonded amalgam restorations

The fact that amalgam itself is not able to bond to a tooth means that the assistance of dental cement is often necessary. It helps keep all the materials together, which is going to support the tooth in jeopardy better.

Liners and pulp protection

Cement is often used to protect the pulp of a tooth when decay is getting too close and starts putting the tooth in jeopardy. An experienced dentist can strategically place dental cement on areas of the tooth that will protect the pulp from infection. This process may require a root canal if the damage to the pulp is quite severe.

Types of dental cement

As stated earlier, each patient and treatment may need a specific cement. Here are the four most common forms of dental cement that dentists use:

  • Glass ionomer
  • Resin-modified glass ionomer
  • Self-etching resin cement
  • Resin cement

Speak with your dentist to see if any of these could irritate your mouth.

Do you still have some questions about your oral health?

This was a brief overview of dental cement, so we understand if you have questions. Please contact us to discuss your concerns or to get answers to your questions. Ignoring your dental anxiety will only make you more nervous about the use of these adhesives.

Our team treats all types of dental cases, and we will use that experience to help you get the best oral care.

If you do not have a dentist and think you may need to see one, then call us and schedule an appointment. Our office can work with your schedule to get you in front of a dentist at a convenient time.

Request an appointment here: https://www.healthysmilesfamilydentistryllc.com or call Healthy Smiles Family Dentistry LLC at (706) 713-5286 for an appointment in our LaGrange office.

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